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... Modern technology and the dating game Modern technology and the dating game


9 October 2008

Modern technology is helping modern consumers out in the dating game, according to new research.


An increasing number of couples and would-be couples are using text messages to flirt and to be romantic.

The survey by AT & T of 1,000 adults aged 18 to 55 found that 68 per cent of respondents have sent a love note via text message.

A further 67 per cent said they used their mobile phone and text messages to flirt with the opposite sex.

Gone are the days when a man would have to write a letter and send it by carrier pigeon to the object of his desire.

Today's daters are able to send messages of love instantaneously to let their other half know how they feel.

Alecia Bridgwater, director of messaging for AT&T's wireless unit, said: "People have discovered that there are moments when just the right text, sent at just the right time, can go a long way to keeping romance alive.

"We wanted to understand more deeply how our customers were using text messaging in this way, and our study turned up some interesting insights."

Couples in established relationships use text messages to send little notes saying "thinking of you" and the like in order to keep their love alive, Information Week reports.

And 28 per cent of couples said they text their significant other at least three times a day in order to keep in touch when they are apart.

Textaholic Dee Casey said texting is part of his dating game. He said: "I spend a ton of time texting every day.

"I think it's much easier to flirt via text message than in person because you have a moment to think of a cute, flirty, creative response without being embarrassed about what the other person will think."

The study did however throw up some negatives about texting and modern technology in general.

One in three respondents said they would be unhappy if their other half re